Adopting a Pet

 

Adopting your BEST FRIEND!

 

 

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Adopting a pet is a SERIOUS COMMITMENT: We strongly encourage anyone thinking about adding a furry member to their family to do their research and to be ready for this commitment. Take a moment to read through this helpful Adopting a Pet page. The SPCA of TN will be happy to work with you in finding out what kind of pet is best for you. If you want to have a pet please make sure you can make a 10-20 year commitment to your pet. If you are not sure about adopting at this time, you can consider fostering for us. If you have any questions please feel free to contact us at spcatn@gmail.com

We will work directly with you providing individualized attention and support in order to help you find the perfect pet(s) for your family. We also suggest you take the time to read through the many resource documents on our website and other sites to prepare yourself for your pet.

You will first be required to complete our application form and agree to our adoption contract. We will require a copy of your driver license and 3 personal references.

In our agreement, we require that every animal be spayed and or neutered (if not prior to adoption) by a specific date. This is VERY important as the overpopulation of dogs and cats in our country is a sad result of too many unplanned litters. If for any reason the match is not as perfect as we all had hoped, the dog or cat must be returned to the SPCA of TN and not given away or turned in to a shelter.

Note: The SPCA of TN requires adopters to be at least 21 years of age. We will require proof of age to finalize any adoption.

The SPCA of TN adoption fees range depending on type of animal, the originating shelter and the vetting the animal has received. Our adoption fees are set to allow us to cover our expenses as well as to help other animals in our program that require additional care. Our fees cover vetting costs, shelter fees, boarding (if needed), behavioral training and additional medical care if the animal require it. By adopting from the SPCA of TN you are not saving just one life, you are helping to save others as well.

In general, you will follow these steps when go to our SPCA of TN website to adopt an animal companion:

  1. Visit the animals available for adoption to find the one(s) who might be right for you on line to www.spcatn.org
  2. Fill out an adoption application (see below) that tells us about yourself and your household so we can facilitate the match-making process.
  3. Talk to a staff member to learn more about your prospective companion and to determine if the pet you are choosing is truly right for you.
  4. Decide whether or not to adopt.
  5. Go through the adoption materials with the Adoption Coordinator. You will receive information about your animal’s vaccination history, as well as other information that will help you once you get your new companion home.
  6. There is a Contract to finalize the adoption process
  7. A home visit is require to make sure your future companion will be a good fit for you and your family.

 

Why I love older dogs?

 

 

 

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Why do I love older dogs? Why NOT? Older dogs, first of all, are some of those in most urgent need of homes. They’re often the first to be put down at kill shelters. They’ve lived their whole lives just hoping for the perfect family, and often they’ve been neglected or mistreated for much of their lives. Then they end up in a shelter and watch while people walk past their hopeful eyes and their gray muzzles, choosing younger, more playful dogs instead. Don’t they deserve to live their golden years being spoiled and loved, just like all the younger dogs will eventually do? I say YES!

Older dogs require far less training than younger dogs. They’re curious but not destructive. I don’t come home to find that older dogs have chewed my couch apart. They are already house broken much of the time, and if they’re not, they’re far easier to housebreak. They’re almost always already crate trained, too! They are typically very mellow – all they want to do is be with their family and feel safe. And they still come with all the benefits you get with a young dog. They’re loyal, protective, loving, and even playful! They may tire more easily, but isn’t that what you want? Who has the energy to entertain a young, crazy, four-legged furball ALL THE TIME? Not me. I find I can play with my older dogs for a little while, but then, when it’s time for me to get to work or clean the house, they’re content just plopping down to watch me. We have our time together, but then I have the very important ME TIME. It’s a perfect balance.

The next time you’re at a shelter, please give some serious consideration to those graying faces and those tails that might not wag as quickly. If you’re looking for a new friend online, do the same. Remember that all dogs get older, and by adopting an older one, you’ll be with your new best friend during the best years of his or her life…and they will be forever grateful.

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